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What are the dangers - the common injuries etc?
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 2:12 pm    Post subject: What are the dangers - the common injuries etc? Reply with quote

What are the common dangers / injuries of the game of underwater hockey / octopush?

For example: In football, the ball is near the feet, ankles and shins and these are common injuries in tackling etc.

In underwater hockey the puck-play looks close to the hand, but also looks close to the head as well! So what are the typical injuries??

Thank you for your thoughts. Tina.
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jellybean



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Posts: 40
Location: UK London

PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Main Danger is that you will become so passionate about the game, your entire life-style will change - your future decendants may evolve webbed-feet and gills Wink

More common though, is:
hand injuries - accidental collision between pusher sticks or the puck itself..... this may sound painful (and could be) yet the game requires the players to wear protective gloves on their 'working hand'...... this offers nearly all protection needed and injuries to the hand are rare. In fact actual contact on the hands is rare, unless you are unfortunate enough to be in a 'scrabbly' game with players with little team skills.

The game is fluently fast and the puck is a heavy object that can be flicked around the pool. People fret over possible injuries sustained by getting hit by the puck - yes it is a possibility - yet it is a natural sense of timing by the players to avoid such places ''not to be''. Injuries by getting hit by the puck are rare indeed.
It is possible to play continuously all year and not witness such an event..... (depends who it is you play with, though!!!! Cool )

JB
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Loss of Teeth!??
I've seen pictures of mouth guards and shield gums being used (I think). Does this mean that teeth loss could be an issue?
Charlie
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natalie
Ravishing Reporter


Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 25
Location: UK Nearwater

PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look at the video on the website and you can see that when two opponents interact, they are close to each other on a 'head-to-head' position.
This makes the 'potential' of contact higher in this area than the shins, ankles and feet, such as in the game of football.
Competition level players usually wear gum shields (they cost around 50 - 100 in UK). All players at the club level should have mouth guards connected to their snorkle mouth piece (they cost 2 - 3 in the UK).

No teeth were lost in the making of this post! Wink
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puckoff



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Posts: 12
Location: UK Sowfeast

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2006 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The thing with this sort of topic, is that if it is read just on its own, it is possible to put people off having a go.

Ive played for 10 years, 2, sometimes 3 times a week, throughout the summer and the winter and have had a few bumps but relative to the amount of play this is neglagible.
Some games (clubs) I play at are better than others for 'good skillful play', some are worse!

So would point out, that it depends on the mentality of the club as to wether you get a good game or a rough game.

Just wanted to point this out as a balanced bit of info so that it is not thought of as being '''too rough''' for some people.

Arrow You do actually learn where not to be - therefore incurring less bruises Exclamation ie: when an opponent sntches the puck away from you and turns on the spot - you no longer want to be there, cus the fins are on their way around to where your face is/was Shocked

Arrow If you dont learn to get out of there (simple to do) then the injury is often a hefty smack on the chin, nose or eye from a thrusting heel - does hurt, does bruise, does cause comment at the office the next day (typical gosip is that its been a big domestic - again!)
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jellybean



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Posts: 40
Location: UK London

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Arrow Bad Flick: can strike the opponent full in the face.
Because the mask covers a large part of the face it can be pushed back onto the brow or cheek and cause a cut or at least a fair size bruise.
Because the nose is soft silicone, a strike here can cause a nose bleed.

A player is not allowed to flick straight at a facing opponent (a flick is supposed to be a method of getting the puck to a team mate or into a clear area of pool to be collected by a team mate).

It is also worthy of note, that some players suffer a hit more than others (may be bad or vunerable positioning).
Also some players tend to strike opponents with a flick more so than others - they are dangerous. and the quicker it is that video record games it will be revealed GOOD AND BAD activities of the game.

JB

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
Loss of Teeth!??
I've seen pictures of mouth guards and shield gums being used (I think). Does this mean that teeth loss could be an issue?
Charlie


If someone in the pool can flick the 3lb puck to the height of your mouth then teeth loss is an issue. Shots anywhere near the head are a foul but accidents happen. I don't remember ever getting hit on the mouth, but that might be because I always wear a mouthguard so it will most likely be a none-event. At our practices we try to make sure everyone is wearing a mouthguard. I know a few players that always wear shield gums.
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Prof Puckit



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Posts: 1
Location: puddletown-by-the-sea

PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lay prostrate on a dry hard floor holding a marker pen in your hand (you'll need permission from the owner or persons responsible for the floor).
Stretching your arm and hand as far away as possible, draw an arc from one side of you, around ahead of you, and finishing to the other side of you.

From above it should look similar to this:

*
.....*
I......*
-O....*
I......*
.....*
*

This is a players 'working' the puck area!
This is where a player moves the puck around with the use of the pusher stick.
The player can shift the puck any where in this zone and swim off in that chosen direction etc etc

NB. ALSO!!!!!.... the puck (if flicked) will be coming out of this zone carrying a high momentum. Usually, water resistance and gravity are forces that attenuate this momentum and bring the puck to rest (probably where the player wanted it, of course).

There are also 4 other common methods of abrupt attenuation of momentum:
1. pusher-stick abrupt attenuation of momentum
2. prehensile abrupt attenuation of momentum
3. cranial abrupt attenuation of momentum
4. dental abrupt attenuationof momentum

1. catches the shifting puck through nifty placement of players pusher-stick and transfers possession of the game to the new player.
2. catches or blocks the shifting puck, but is deemed a foul through illegal use of hand.
3. & 4. these are both similar in nature to each other (only different in area of impact, ie head/face or teeth respectively).
Both transfer the kinetic energy of the pucks momentum, on contact, into several other energy types, such as heat and sound (after transfering as much kenetic energy to the place of contact as possible... impact displacement held as new potential energy... usually in the form of a dented head or re-arranged teeth).

It is illegal to flick a puck near the head..... but all players should be aware of the working area and what the player is about to do with the puck.
It is not good to use head or teeth to complete abrupt attenuation of momentum of the puck..... it is bad for the game..... and it is disrespectful to the laws of physics. Wink

Prof Puckit
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loser



Joined: 27 May 2006
Posts: 36
Location: UK

PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh my god,

very rare situation in this age of underwater, used to be common when the game used lead pucks.........

......if you can remember the game with lead pucks that is
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melanie



Joined: 11 Aug 2006
Posts: 31
Location: UK

PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Both transfer the kinetic energy of the pucks momentum, on contact, into several other energy types, such as heat and sound (after transfering as much kenetic energy to the place of contact as possible... impact displacement held as new potential energy... usually in the form of a dented head or re-arranged teeth).

It is illegal to flick a puck near the head..... but all players should be aware of the working area and what the player is about to do with the puck.
It is not good to use head or teeth to complete abrupt attenuation of momentum of the puck..... it is bad for the game..... and it is disrespectful to the laws of physics. Wink


Ha Ha, Prof! very good info! thanks. This is of course a pretty rare occurance, even at competition level, but worthy of attention, indeed. x
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godya
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2006 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

most other sports have the beauty of an action reply system which allows officals to review, or see wat happened..........similar to CCTV which captures full incident s. As in case of problem a neutral ref / individual can provide information as to wat take place.... Wink

very happy Razz

shame that underwater hockey does not offer this facility that way if a player \ s have commited an offence or injuried someone, the insurance and all officals can see if this was fair play or not!
Laughing
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loser



Joined: 27 May 2006
Posts: 36
Location: UK

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

other common injuries,

faced in a game of non contact sport, slashing from fins......worst night mare, always shape and hurts really bad..... i dont like much.

some players use left arm \ non playing arm... contact again applied, this can be accidental \ intential the later would be rare, but i see ya point about the need for control of the game godya because some injuries go with out attention, or missed for what ever reason.


usual ingnorance...... unless you happen to have some good characters about who are impartial......... Laughing
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miss marple
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Banging head or shoulders on overhead things like steps that are permenantly fixed on the side of the pool.
In the deep end, they go down a metre or so and this leaves a metre or so to the bottom. Not usually a prob for swimmers.. surface swimmers. But if playing underwater hockey on the bottom near the edge where the steps are, then occasionally you pop to the surface and catch head or shoulder or back on the hanging steps. ooch!

If the steps are retractable or able to be removed I know all clubs do this first. In some pools they are fixed. So be aware. This isnt a sport injury as such, but it is a club hazard just to be aware of.

Confused Surprised
miss marple
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flusey



Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Posts: 4
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To swallow or spit becomes a mere secondary reaction when faced with the problem in inhailing a mouthful of water...

ie: taking a deep breath when your snorkle is not quite above the surface !

To actually hear someone splutter away is in itself quite rare - to actually drown from this is unheard of to date since 1954 - so both extreme problems of this area are not common at all - which, considering the amount of time in the water environment, and the amount of time up and down inhailing and exhaling, makes this injury very negligiable as a risk, although would obviously carry a high hazard level

I know this post is about common injuries, but thought it worth a mention as may be a common fear/worry from some people that have not played before.

Flu

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Stephen



Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Posts: 14
Location: UK plymouth

PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2007 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding loss of teeth.... the possibility....

because each player has a snorkle mouth piece kept in mouth during play, there dont seem to be many incidents of getting a puck in your mouth which could take a few teeth with it.
Nowadays, most snorkles I've seen at club levels have self venting valves at the inhalent end and these valves on some designs are in a solid plastic molded bit... if this caught a wack from a passing fin etc it pushes back pretty close to the teeth line and could rattle a few dentures.

Players in high level comps are required to wear gum shields, which offer good impact protection should it occur.... but it is actually very rare. These gum shields can be got from your local sports shop.... the boxing ones.... for a few quid. Apparently you buy one, heat it up and insert into mouth for the first time, bite down and wait for it to cool.... it then has the moulded shape of your teeth line and so future use feels comfortable.

When I first started I remember getting fullon kicks in the face as I was reluctant to retreat when a player turned in front of me... I eventually learned the association of:
Player turning = kicking legs, feet and fins will be along shortly!
As you learn, or listen to stories and tips such as this one... you soon find you are playing the game, but actively avoiding most points/possibilities of uneccessary contact.
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